Intellectual Middleware keynote references

Below are the references (in order of appearance) for my keynote lecture on “Intellectual Middleware” at the Digital Humanities Opening Seminar, Academy of Finland, Turku, March 22, 2016.

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The list is preliminary and will be corrected and finalized later (apologies for any errors and omissions).

Drucker, Johanna and Svensson, Patrik. Forthcoming. “The Why and How of Middleware”. Digital Humanities Quarterly.

Underwood, Ted. 2012. “How not to do things with words”, blog entry, August 25, 2012.

Fenton, William. 2015. “Humanizing Maps: An Interview with Johanna Drucker“, PCMAG, October 1, 2015.

Presner, Todd. 2014/forthcoming. “The Ethics of the Algorithm: Close and Distant Readings of the Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive” (forthcoming in: History Unlimited: Probing the Ethics of Holocaust Culture, eds. Claudio Fogu, Wulf Kansteiner, and Todd Presner (Cambridge: Harvard University Press).

Streaming Cultural Heritage: Following Files In Digital Music Distribution. Project website.

Kelty, Christopher. 2007. “Against Networks”. Unpublished.

Hathcock, April. 2016. “Open But Not Equal: Open Scholarship for Social Justice”, Talk Graduate Center February 5, 2016 (text from February 8).

Scott-Webber, Lennie. 2004. In Sync: Environmental Behavior Research and the Design of Learning Spaces. The Society for College and University Planning.

Svensson, Patrik. 2011. “From Optical Fiber to Conceptual Cyberinfrastructure”, Digital Humanities Quarterly (2011).

D’Ignazio, Catherine. “What would feminist data visualization look like?”. MIT Center for Civic Media.

Robles-Anderson, Erica and Svensson, Patrik. 2016. “‘One Damn Slide After Another’: PowerPoint at every Occasion for Speech”. Computational Culture. Issue 5 (2016).

”Genres of Scholarly Knowledge Production”. Curated online collection. Curator: Patrik Svensson.

Lindhé, Cecilia. 2015. “Medieval Materiality through the Digital Lens”, in Svensson, Patrik and Goldberg, David Theo (eds.), Between Humanities and the Digital, Cambridge, MA.:MIT Press, 193-204.

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